Posts Tagged ‘YA’

Rite of Annarii by A Maslo

May 22, 2017 - 6:47 pm No Comments

Rite of Annarii by A Maslo

Published by Feather Dream Press on 12th May 2017

197 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Fellywynne is a human living with the Fae folk. Having been abandoned at birth, Fellwynne was lucky to be brought up by these magical folk.  We join Fellwynne as she is about to graduate and take up her role in the community.

Fellwynne was a considerate young girl and although different she made adaptions to fit in. She and her best friend Willow Leafshimmer were inseparable and I like how the author incorporated Willow in the story letting her enjoy Fellwynne’s quest. Having Drake, Willow’s boyfriend on the journey could have made Fellwynne into a third wheel, but the author introduced us to Aleck Stormblood, the 1st commander of the Annarii Elite. On their travels Fellwynne grew into a woman and became the diplomat that the elders knew she would, she was not afraid of danger and stood up for people more unfortunate then herself.

One of favourite scenes was the back story about Kiari and her rooster, I could not stop laughing when Kiari told her story and the length of time it took Willow to catch on. The author had a style of writing that took you on the journey, the descriptive way she wrote the story, had you feeling that you were following in Fellwynne’s footsteps, even the minor scenes had a lot of detail. A simple task of collecting berries had you feeling that you were there, getting sunburnt whilst you were filling the baskets with elderberries.

I got so into this story that I could not believe when I had finished it, I just wanted to carry on with Fellwynne’s quest. If you love fantasy and adventure books then you will love this story. With a touch of romance which does not detract from the main story, this will appeal to a lot of readers. I cannot wait to continue on this journey and I hope I do not have to wait long to do so.

Son of a Kitchen Witch by Tim Hemlin

April 9, 2017 - 7:05 pm No Comments

Son of a Kitchen Witch by Tim Hemlin

Published by La Nouvelle Atlantide Press on 1st February 2017

285 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Bobby Hawthorne Jr was your typical teenager, not one of then IT crowd, but mainly left alone except by Jimmy Pearson, he knew which buttons to press to make Bobby really angry especially when it came to his best friend and secret crush Angelina Dellapicallo. The only thing that made him different to all the other teenagers was that his mom was a witch. Olivia was a chef and owner of a restaurant, she had been running it by herself since her husband died when Bobby was young.  She manages to keep her secret from her neighbours even with Jax the pixie flitting about and with her close friends Crystal and Earlene help keep Bobby safe, much to the annoyance of Bobby who feels that they are keeping far too many secrets and when his granddad turns up he knows to be worried. With the appearance of hellhounds and the dark magic getting stronger can Bobby and his witchy friends survive.

It was nice to have a main character with flaws, Bobby was not your perfect teenager, his anger issues got him referred to a counsellor which even in today’s society is still not a subject that is openly discussed. The story highlighted how close Bobby and Angelina were and although they did fancy each other, it showed that their friendship was a lot stronger than a teenage crush. When Bobby shared his secret with Angelina it showed how mature Angelina was and enforced how much trust they had with each other. Olivia was an overprotective mother, but with what happened to her husband you could understand why. The inclusion of the minor characters was explained in detail and one of my favourite characters was Cactus Rose, who Bobby found out to be his Great Aunt. A witch who was not afraid to dabble with the dark side.

Having read the author’s mystery book, I can say without a doubt, that he is definitely a multi genre author and yet again has written an exciting story. This story is full of action with a hint of mystery and with the use of magic anything is possible. A great read which will suit young and older readers alike and with the story finishing with the hint of book 2 I hope it will not be long before I read more of Bobby’s adventures.

Beatrice Beecham’s Cryptic Crypt by Dave Jeffery

March 3, 2017 - 5:51 pm No Comments

Beatrice Beecham’s Cryptic Crypt by Dave Jeffery

Published by Crystal Lake Publishing on 3rd March 2017

277 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Dorsa Finn, has its secrets. A typical quiet coastal town where everyone knows each other. Mayor Codd wants to keep his town peaceful, so when the Blue Thunder Foundation wants to set up their new base, Mayor Codd jumps at the chance and wants every teenage boy to sign up to the project. Beatrice, Patience, Elmo and Lucas are The Newshounds; 4 teenagers who like nothing else but a good mystery but with strange tremors, re-educated boys and history resurfacing they get more than they bargained for.

It takes a skill to write from the POV of a teenager without it sounding annoying and immature and Dave Jeffery has nailed it. These 4 teenagers had a really great friendship and relied on each other for support. I did not find any of the characters annoying. I personally thought that the girls Beatrice and Patience was the brains behind the group. Beatrice was a great chef and I did smile to myself when to help her make decisions had an imaginary debate with her favourite chefs and Patience had a knack with languages and that came in useful when a new resident came to live in Dorsa Finn who was deaf. When the older generation were in trouble, the Newshounds were the ones they called. Talking about the older residents Maud and Agnes where my favourites characters as they reminded me so much of Cissie and Ada, and if you are too young to remember them, then google Les Dawson

Using the link between the Occult and the Third Reich as the base of the story added mystery and intrigue. This enabled the author to explain the history of some of the older residents of Dorsa Finn whilst adding a supernatural element to the story.

This book is not just for teenagers, as an adult I enjoyed reading it as there was enough mystery and intrigue to keep my interest. The author teased you throughout the book dropping hints about what the Blue Thunder Foundation were and what their beliefs were but it was not till the end of the book that the secrets came out. This is the 1st book that I have read by Dave Jeffery and although there are other books starring Beatrice Beecham, you do not have to read them to understand and enjoy this story. Move over Nancy Drew, watch out Mystery Incorporated there are a new gang of teenagers in town.

The Keeper of Dragons: The Prince Returns by JA Culican

January 22, 2017 - 9:29 pm No Comments

The Keeper of Dragons: The Prince Returns by JA Culican

Published 21st June 2016

284 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Colt was your average Joe, liked to keep himself to himself, but just before his 18th birthday, his parents tell him something that would change his life for ever. Not only was he adopted but his real parents were coming to take him away. Meeting his biological parents were scary enough but to find out that they are both dragons and King and Queen of Ochana, and that he was as a dragon as well was nothing like he imagined.  However, when he landed in Ochana he was in for a bigger shock, he was the keeper of dragons and they needed him to save their race.

Everything that Colt had gone through, I was really surprised how quickly he accepted it all, and although he kept doubting himself, he did take his role serious. The involvement of his best friend, helped with his confidence and I hope to learn more about her life in future books.

If you love dragons, your imagination can go wild with this story. The way Ochana was described, I could picture the place especially the scenes in the market. The detail description of each dragon fraction helped explain the country’s history. With the addition of other fantasy creatures made this an enjoyable read. With the action building throughout the story, it was a quick read as I wanted to know if they survived. Although not finishing on a cliff-hanger, it did leave it open for further books

The Treemakers: Book 1 in The Treemakers Trilogy by Christina L Rozelle

January 21, 2017 - 12:25 pm No Comments

The Treemakers: Book 1 in The Treemakers Trilogy by Christina L Rozelle

Published by A Spark in the Dark Press on 3rd December 2014

288 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

The Earth is dying, trees are in high demand and a factory in Greenleigh are contracted to make them. The treemakers are mainly orphaned children, orphaned as the adults do not live past 30 years. Worked to the bone, fed slop and overseen by 4 evil Superiors, the children have no life at all. Trying to look after them is Joy or to the kids Momma Joy, a 16-year-old girl who lost her parents a couple of years before.  Sneaking out at night, Joy and her best friend Jax explore the unused areas to try and find items to make the children’s lives easier. On a regular nightly visit, they come across an open lift, and this discovery changes their lives for ever. From that moment, they knew that they had to get the children out. With help from Smudge, a girl with many secrets, Joy takes all the children on a dangerous adventure.

I took to Joy straightaway as I found her to be a caring selfless person. She was still a child herself but she knew that as the one of the eldest, she had to look after the younger children. Working hard all day she still took time to tell them bedtime stories and to look after the wellbeing. Never forgetting who her parents were, their words would get her through the toughest times.

Some of the scenes in the factory were distressing as these children had a horrendous life. When the children when in isolation, although not mentioned you could only imagine what evil depraved actions the Superiors were inflicting on them. I found Emmanuel Superior a very sick minded individual.

Whilst reading this book I was on an emotional rollercoaster, feeling sorry for the children and then willing them to escape. The action in the story intensified the further on I read. Not wanting to put this down it was a quick read. This is a great story for older teenager and adults alike as it does have some upsetting themes, but this is a dystopian world, and survival is the most important thing.  With some questions left unanswered at the end I am off to read book 2. A great exciting read