Posts Tagged ‘Tracy Fahey’

The Girl in the Fort by Tracy Fahey

November 19, 2018 - 10:47 pm No Comments

The Girl in the Fort by Tracy Fahey
Published by Fox Spirit Books on 26th October 2017
230 pages

Vivian was a city girl born and bred in Dublin, she acted older than her age. When her dad had to go to America, he left her with her maternal grandparents. Not knowing anything about them and being stuck in the country with nothing to do, she hated everything about it. However, when she began to learn about the folklore and found the fort, her time there became more interesting.
Vivian was like a lot of young girls, living in a city there was always something to do. Staying in the country she had a lot of adjusting to do.
Set in the 80s I enjoyed reminiscing whilst I read this story, especially getting Smash Hits every week and using the family phone to make a call and not to chat for ages.
As the author is an expert in folklore, I knew that I would be transported into a magical read and I was not disappointed. A coming of age story, you follow Vivian as she makes new friends and starts to believe in magic. When there was trouble she showed a certain level of maturity which you would not expect in such a young girl. Scattered throughout the story was old folklore tales told by her Grandma, and I enjoyed reading her stories as it linked the past to Vivian’s present. This was an easy read as it was so beautifully written, the descriptive writing enabled you to imagine that you had found the fort and was exploring the countryside. As I was reading this I did wonder whether the author delved into her childhood for her ideas as I imagined her listening to tales told by her grandma.
This is a perfect book for any age and a book that you get so involved in that you can read it in one sitting. I am looking forward to reading more from this author and I hope that she brings out more novels.

Imposter Syndrome edited by James Everington and Dan Howarth

December 12, 2017 - 11:26 pm No Comments

Imposter Syndrome edited by James Everington and Dan Howarth
Published by Dark Mind Press on 25th November 2017
182 pages
Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

What if you see some who looks like you? or you think you are living with the wrong family? These questions and more are answered by 10 authors in this anthology.
I Know What They Look Like by Gary McMahon: A taxi driver picks up a fare and gets more than he bargains for. A great opening to the book and really sets the scene. Strange things tend to happen at night, evil lurks in the shadows. Whilst reading this I was imagining it set as a black and white movie, and felt the apprehension when he picked up his fare and was completing his 1st task.
In the Marrow by Laura Mauro: Most little girls imaging they see faeries, and come up with ways to trap them. Hazel and Tara were no different. However, when Tara became ill, Hazel knew exactly how to cure her. As I was reading this story, I did wonder if Hazel was making the story up to cope with Tara’s illness. A beautifully written story.
Who is that on the Other Side of You by Timothy J Jarvis: Croker and Learmouth are on an expedition to Antarctica. Spitting imagine of each other except for a birthmark. The story of the expedition is writing in actual time, whilst their history was written in the format of a diary. This enabled the story to flow and helped describe the characters in detail. An intriguing story about adventure and betrayal.
What’s Yours is Mine by Holly Ice: After visiting her mom, Sophie finds out a secret that will affect her whole life. Whilst it was early on that Sophie found out her mom’s secret, the author writes it in a way that you think that due to her mom’s illness she is making it up. Throughout the story bits of Sophie’s past is revealed and slowly you realise just how big the secret was. The ending could have been a bit more graphic for me, but I enjoyed how this story was planned out
The Insider by Neil Williamson: A story based on the online world. Raymond is in Italy on business and a similar twitter account is causing him problems. This story explored how it is so easy to pretend to be someone else online. It shows how folk can hide behind a keyboard and post to get a rise from other users.
Other People’s Dreams by Stephen Bacon: Waking up after being involved in a bombing not knowing your past is scary enough, but add to that the graphic dreams, you can understand why he needs to see a doctor. Coming across a double gives him a new purpose in life. I really enjoyed this story, the graphic dreams, memory loss and the psychobabble. It had me wondering throughout what type of man the main character was, was he a murderer. The obsessive nature of the character once he found his double was scary. The author kept you guessing where the story was going.
Hold my Hand and I’ll Take You There by Ralph Robert Moore: This story follows Noah as a boy he battles a life-threatening illness, as a man he falls in love with Audrey, a woman who is suffering with mental health. This was one of the most moving stories that I have read. As a mom reading about young Noah’s suffering was heart-breaking, but the author gave me hope when Noah met Audrey. A twist had me stopping reading for a minute as I did not expect where the story was going. A great read.
The Wrong House by Tracy Fahey: Tom wakes up one morning and finds out that he is in the wrong house with the wrong family. Following Tom over a couple of days, the reason for his feeling is revealed. From the opening paragraph, you know something is wrong, but you do not know whether it is Tom or the house. Scenarios kept running through my mind as I was reading. The author has a way of telling a story that draws you in and makes you want to read more so you can find out what is happening. A heart-rending ending that explains the whole story.
Little Heart by Georgina Bruce: I have always wondered what goes through a child’s mind when their parent is a famous actor. The story explains detachment and how even as an adult it affected her. This story had a film noir feel to it and with scenes involving the film, added intrigue to it. A story that if you read it again, you will find something new.
Virtually Famous by Phil Sloman: From the start this story got me hooked. The opening line “He died a thousand times today and would die a thousand more”. Chet Tyler was fixated on his own game and whilst some gamers wanted to be him others wanted to kill him. The fascination Chet had with the game was unnatural. The author has the knack of making you unsure whether you are reading the gaming or Chet’s experience. The lines of fact and fiction is blurred. You know Chet had a substance abuse but was he imagining it. All this made me want to read more. A page turner with a great ending.
This anthology was a great read and a brilliant choice of authors.

The Unheimlich Manoeuvre by Tracy Fahey

October 26, 2016 - 8:51 pm No Comments

The Unheimlich Manoeuvre by Tracy Fahey

Published by Boo Books on 16th July 2016

139 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

31303073

What attracted me to this book was the title. Like everyone else I had heard of the Heimlich manoeuvre but not the unheimlich manoeuvre and thanks to an informative introduction by Cate Gardner, I now know that it is a German word meaning uncanny or weird and these 14 short stories were spot on with this definition.

The stories that stood out for me were:

Coming Back is a story about a girl coming out of a coma and the after effects of her recovery. With the help of a mysterious visitor, she makes some life changes. Reading this you wonder how many people had gone through what she did and the changes they made.

The Woman Next Door is a story about a new mom. Whilst I was reading this I was thinking back to when I had my children and the tiredness I felt trying to run a household and looking after a new baby, but the ending is every mom’s nightmare and was unexpected, a great twist.

Sealed is the story of a young girl with agoraphobia. I read this story thinking that she also had OCD, but as the story developed, my heart went out to her when I read the reason for her condition. I cheered at the end and I do hope that she did escape her surroundings.

Finding out that this was Tracy’s first published book was a surprise and I hope that I get to read more of her work. All the stories are full of tension and I got immersed in each story to the point that when I finished it left me thinking what would I do in that situation? Or What would I have done different? I enjoyed reading every story and I hope that Tracy will publish more of her short stories.