Posts Tagged ‘Supernatural’

Supernatural Night Terror: John Passarella

August 4, 2017 - 11:05 am No Comments

Night Terror (Supernatural 9)

Author: John Passarella

publisher: Titan Books

page count: 381pp

Release date: 1st Jan 2011

I’ve read a couple of John’s Supernatural tie-ins and have really enjoyed them. It’s clear he’s a fan of the show and knows his characters – I particularly enjoyed the nightmare scenes. At one point (I’ll just say tummy issues) it’s pretty obvious why he’s a Bram Stoker award winner – the nightmare I’m on about is pure ewwww. With lashings of yuk. It’s a nice plot based on some cool mythology and it rattles along at a good pace. Great fun and seeing Soulless Sam again was really cool. Yes I’m evil, but I loved that version of Sam for humour.

Supernatural: Mythmaker by Tim Waggoner

June 21, 2017 - 1:02 pm No Comments

Supernatural: Mythmaker
Author: Tim Waggoner
Publisher: Titan Books
Page count: 301pp
Release date: 29th July 2016
Series: 10: Between Hibbing 911 and The Things We Left Behind

Reviewer: Theresa Derwin

Ok, where to start?
I’m a huge Supernatural fan, a part of the #SPNFamily, a #WaywardDaughter/Sister. Suffice to say, I know the universe and characters of this outstanding TV show pretty damn well. So, when I read the fan fic (Destiel anyone?) or these TV tie-ins released by Titan Books, I’m a good judge. I’m a rabid fan, but also a common sense fan, and I know what doesn’t work.
But, for the uninitiated- here’s the basic concept of the show;
The Winchesters; Family Business; Hunting Things, Saving People.
The show, starting in 2005, begins ’22 years ago’, with six month old Sammy Winchester asleep in his crib, and 4 year old older brother Dean asleep in bed.
A yellow eyed demon creeps into Sammy’s room. Mom, Mary Winchester investigates and kaboom – Crispy Fried Mom.
22 years later (series one), Dean heads to Stanford where Sam is at Uni, and tells him;
“Dad’s on a hunting trip; he hasn’t been home in a week.”
But hunting what?
The answer is basically monsters. Vampires, demons, shifters, witches, werewolves, ghosts – supernatural creatures.


This novel written by Bram Stoker award winning author Tim Waggoner is set in series ten.
A lot of crap has happened to the boys. And no, I won’t spoil it for you.
What I will say, is you can catch on pretty easy from Waggoner’s careful exposition what the series is all about.
In ‘Mythmaker’, Rene is a talented young artist who recently has been painting strange, powerful creatures, but as she finishes the painting, the mythology figure disappears from the canvas. And the process is literally draining her; physically, mentally and emotionally.
In the small town of Corinth, a
silver, gauntleted woman appears, with astounding powers, and she begins to gather followers. Adamantine believes herself to be a god with a little ‘g’.
But she’s not the only one popping up in the town. In fact, there’s a shed load of them. Rene is the ‘Mythmaker’ inadvertently creating these monsters.
And in a kind of mash up between Highlander and #SPN S5 episode ‘Hammer of the Gods’ they must fight until there is only one left standing, who will destroy all of the rest, absorbing their powers. And these gods can be fickle. And deadly.
Enter stage left; Sam and Dean Winchester.
Sam is worried about Dean, bearing the ‘Mark of Cain’ and that’s the underlying tension in season ten. It basically makes him even angrier than his normally very angry self.
As a book in its own right, there’s humour, monster bashing, with Waggoner blending myths and his own imagination to generate all manner of beasties, blood, emotion, and a cracking final fight scene.
For #SPN fans, it’s so much more.
Sam and Dean are spot on; Dean’s reaction to Adamantine that much more intense.
The banter between the two brothers is funny and heart warming, as is the love they obviously share but don’t talk about (hey, they’re dudes), but in the end, they’re there for each other. It seems Waggoner knows the series inside out.
The supporting cast characters are also very well realised, and I particularly liked Paeon.
I can see why this particular novel has been nominated for a TV tie-in award.
It’s a worthy contender.
5/5

City of Ghosts (GhostWriters Book 1) by JH Moncrieff

June 17, 2017 - 7:55 am No Comments

City of Ghosts (GhostWriters Book 1) by JH Moncrieff

Published by DeathZone Books on 15th April 2017

282 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Wanting to be the next great author, Jackson Stone has come up with an idea to write about haunted places. Travelling round China, Jackson decides to ditch his tour group and spend a night in Hensu. Supposedly haunted, Jackson a non-believer, thinks nothing of it when Yuehai a mysterious young woman joins him and wants him to tell her story. However, the further he delves into her story, the more he finds himself in danger, running for his life, he needs to trust someone and finds himself turning to Kate a member of the group who has a special talent. Can they tell Yuehai’s story before time runs out?

At the start of this story Jackson was a sceptic when it came to ghosts and just thought that it was an easy option to get a best seller. As he starts to look into the Hensu flooding, his curiosity gets the better of him and he starts asking questions which draws attention from the wrong people. Although Jackson was easy to like and was a team player I had the feeling that he was a bit of loner and found it hard to trust.  He was confident in himself and even used his skin colour to escape capture, however he did have a guilty secret, and it took the help of Kate for him to shed his guilt.

Kate had a soft spot for Jackson from the start and always found a way to gravitate towards him. She was always a target from one nasty girl in the group and although she defended herself you could tell it hurt her feelings. Once she told Jackson about her talent their friendship moved to another level and if the circumstances were different I could see them becoming a couple.

Whilst the story revolved around Jackson and Kate, reading this story you get to know about the other people on this trip. The minor characters were described in detail and whilst they were minor they all played a role in Jackson being able to tell Yuehai’s story. Set in China, Jackson had the added barrier of not using the internet to search for information, and you could sense his struggle in finding out what had happened. This shows just how much we rely on the internet to get our answers. The start of the story was a steady pace as you get to know the characters, but as the story of Hensu is revealed and you realise that Jackson’s life is in danger, the pace quickens up. Whilst this is a supernatural read, this book does not rely solely on the hauntings to tell the story. This way of telling the story added suspense as you did not know when it was going to happen. The action is nonstop, which builds up to a dramatic ending.

This is the 1st book I have read by this author and I did enjoy this story. Book 2 in this series is already out

 

Beatrice Beecham’s Cryptic Crypt by Dave Jeffery

March 3, 2017 - 5:51 pm No Comments

Beatrice Beecham’s Cryptic Crypt by Dave Jeffery

Published by Crystal Lake Publishing on 3rd March 2017

277 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Dorsa Finn, has its secrets. A typical quiet coastal town where everyone knows each other. Mayor Codd wants to keep his town peaceful, so when the Blue Thunder Foundation wants to set up their new base, Mayor Codd jumps at the chance and wants every teenage boy to sign up to the project. Beatrice, Patience, Elmo and Lucas are The Newshounds; 4 teenagers who like nothing else but a good mystery but with strange tremors, re-educated boys and history resurfacing they get more than they bargained for.

It takes a skill to write from the POV of a teenager without it sounding annoying and immature and Dave Jeffery has nailed it. These 4 teenagers had a really great friendship and relied on each other for support. I did not find any of the characters annoying. I personally thought that the girls Beatrice and Patience was the brains behind the group. Beatrice was a great chef and I did smile to myself when to help her make decisions had an imaginary debate with her favourite chefs and Patience had a knack with languages and that came in useful when a new resident came to live in Dorsa Finn who was deaf. When the older generation were in trouble, the Newshounds were the ones they called. Talking about the older residents Maud and Agnes where my favourites characters as they reminded me so much of Cissie and Ada, and if you are too young to remember them, then google Les Dawson

Using the link between the Occult and the Third Reich as the base of the story added mystery and intrigue. This enabled the author to explain the history of some of the older residents of Dorsa Finn whilst adding a supernatural element to the story.

This book is not just for teenagers, as an adult I enjoyed reading it as there was enough mystery and intrigue to keep my interest. The author teased you throughout the book dropping hints about what the Blue Thunder Foundation were and what their beliefs were but it was not till the end of the book that the secrets came out. This is the 1st book that I have read by Dave Jeffery and although there are other books starring Beatrice Beecham, you do not have to read them to understand and enjoy this story. Move over Nancy Drew, watch out Mystery Incorporated there are a new gang of teenagers in town.

Two Novellas that are a good introduction to their series

February 11, 2017 - 8:20 am No Comments

Eyes (The Irises Series Book 1) by Veronique Poirier

Published 10th July 2016

94 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Natacha is an Iris, her emotions change her eye colour, but that is just the tip of her powers. Unbeknown to her she has been stalked for the majority of her adult life, by Alex another Iris, who knows that there is something special about her, but when her life is in danger, can he protect the girl he has fallen for. With two villains to confront each with a dodgy past, they are going to have their work cut out.

Natacha throughout this story, never played the damsel in distress, even when she knows of her past, she takes it all in her stride. Alex is your brooding alpha male, who even though he knew what he wanted he never was pushy. The love interest was evenly paced throughout and did not detract from the main story. The author certainly knows how to write a story, this story was full of suspense and with the added twists, made it a real page turner. When I finished it, I wanted to carry on with the story.

A great start to a unique series and I hope that I do not have to wait to long for book 2

 

Cloaked: A Wulfkin Legacy Novella by TF Walsh

Published by Crimson Romance on 4th January 2016

100 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Set in Romania, Daciana is on rohang, very similar to the Amish Rumspringa, the only difference is that Daciana is a moonwolf and has to spend her year away from her pack and live with humans. Thanks to her animal instincts she has managed to get a job at the Animal Institute in Brașov, where her main task is to look after 3 young bear cubs, but when the bears go missing, she is in trouble of losing everything. To protect her freedom, she joins up with Connell a police officer to track down who is behind it.

Daciana was very independent woman and with the added threat of her losing everything made her more determined to track down the culprits.

There was an even balance of suspense and romance to keep both genre lovers happy. The author describing Daciana as being a moonwolf, makes me wonder if they are differences between her and a regular werewolf and I hope to find out more in the other books in this series. I enjoyed the way the author concentrated on Daciana and her job and her investigations. Leaving questions unanswered like how will her pack take to her falling in love with a human, has made me want to read more in the series. A good quick read