Posts Tagged ‘Split Worlds’

Any Other Name

June 12, 2013 - 9:10 pm No Comments

Any Other Name
Author: Emma Newman
Publisher: Angry Robot
Page count: 416pp
Release Date: 6th June 2013
Reviewer: Theresa Derwin
Following directly on from the first book in the series, Between Two Thorns, Any Other Name continues the tale of Catherine Rhoeas-Papever, inhabitant of the Nether, Aquae Sulis, an alternative version of Bath, steeped in the Regency and Victorian period. In the first book, Cathy has escaped into ‘normal’ society and lives a life as a student in Manchester, until she is kidnapped by her brother and returned to the Nether, where she is told she will marry William Reticulat-Iris, at the wish of her Fae Patroon Lord Poppy.
This sequel begins with Cathy drugged up to her eyeballs on poppy milk on her wedding morning, vaguely aware that the wedding is about to take place, until a spell lifts her haze and she finds herself in a carriage on the way to the ceremony. At the same time back in the normal human world, Cathy’s friend Sam knows he has to return to fae world Exilium to rescue a number of human models who have been kidnapped and are living in slavery. Concentrating on this return, and his promises to Cathy, his relationship with his wife Leanne is drifting further and further apart. She has moved to London and set up a home and is ensconced in her new career. Meanwhile Arbiter (private detective) Max with his rather friendly as yet unnamed gargoyle is investigating a series of murders in the Bath Chapter where the hearts have been turned into stone.
Back to the wedding day and Cathy must either try to live a new restricted life with William, who really wants to be with disgraced Rosa Amelia, or escape the Fae Lords and magic of the Nether to continue her live as a normal human.
Cathy is a strong female figure despite following the etiquette of Nether society when required of her, as she steadfastly attempts to fight the constraints of the pre-Victorian society and the subjugation of women. Adept at sorting out a major crisis, spying and hiding, Cathy’s husband Will wonders how his new wife can be so clever in some things, yet s inept at others. Cathy is a complex character who gradually learns more about herself as the novel progresses. The book itself is cram packed with politics, subterfuge, adventure and plain old fun. The gargoyle sidekick is my favourite character without a doubt and there is an eclectic mix to choose from.
Newman proved her historical knowledge and literary talents in the first book, and like the first book, Any Other Name is incredibly difficult to put down.

Three Wishes

May 10, 2013 - 3:30 pm No Comments

If you were granted three wishes…

If you’ve read “Between Two Thorns” you already know that the fairy-tale trope of being awarded three wishes fascinates me. As a child I spent countless hours day-dreaming about what I’d wish for, ironically enough just like all good fae-touched children are encouraged to do in the Split Worlds.

Now the launch of the second part of the Split Worlds trilogy “Any Other Name” is on the horizon and I want to do something kind of crazy to celebrate. Are you ready?

I want to make a community of people publicly making three wishes and then, where possible, granting said wishes.

“These three wishes are part of a wish-making community organised by author Emma Newman to celebrate the release of the second Split Worlds novel “Any Other Name”. Can you make any of them come true? Come and see what other people are wishing for and find out how to join in at www.splitworlds.com/split-worlds-extra/three-wishes – who knows, perhaps someone could make one of your wishes come true.”

There are two reasons: One is that it enables people to find out about the wishing community so they can join in too. The second is that if you make that link active, (hopefully) it should make a little pingback doohicky appear in my email so I know you’ve joined in. Then I’ll summarise your wishes and link to them on there, so people can find you.

My three wishes are:
1. A book deal for my novel Mercy about witches and angels
2. My weight loss to continue (lost 8.5lb so far)
3. To get a holiday flat or chalet in the UK to take my Dad 79 years and poorly on a little break this summer to cheer him up.

I can grant a wish: Emma, I’m a small publisher Fringeworks with a horror imprint KnightWatch Press, and I would love to read your wish-makers novellas/novels. Forward them to me please.

Between Two Thorns

March 22, 2013 - 2:16 pm No Comments

Between Two Thorns
Author: Emma Newman
Publisher: Angry Robot
Page count/size: 416pp
Release Date: 7 March 2013
Reviewer: Theresa Derwin

In this new Urban Fantasy, part one of the Split Worlds trilogy, we meet young Cathy, or Catherine Rhoeas-Papaver, a woman who wants to escape the constraints of her faux Victorian existence in Aquae Sulis, the Nether mirror image city of Bath, a magical place in which the Fae co-exist with selected humans. Cathy has escaped and is living hidden in Manchester Mundanus (the real world) hiding out from her family. She is doing well until she is found by Lord Poppy, Lord of the Fae Court who insists she return to the Nether for her coming of age. He removes the charm from her that hides her from her family, so before you can blink, she is dragged back to Aquae Sulis by her brother Tom and informed by her father that she is to marry young William, a highly prised stud from the Iris family.

Whilst all of this is going on, Max, an Arbiter (magically-enhanced private detective/policeman), is investigating the disappearance of humans from Mundanus and the disappearance of Cathy’s uncle, a powerful politician in the world of the Nether.

It is when we enter the world of the Nether and Aquae Sulis that things really sparkle (though not in a horrible vampire/fairy way). Newman’s world building is exemplary, as is her characterisations. Max in particular with his ‘partner’ the gargoyle (I will say no more here) is great fun. As Cathy has to relearn her manners, there are plenty of moments to find humour.

I am not going to fill out this review with a mass of reasons why this book is so good. I’m just going to share this; I started reading and was enamoured. I read this on my kindle, and suddenly looked to see I was fifty percent in and wondered how I’d got there. I then looked and saw I was sevent-five percent in and got upset. Why? Because my journey through the Split Worlds was near an end and I was dissapointed. It has been a very long time since I have read a book that has enthralled me to the extent I become miserable at the thought of it ending. Well done Newman. I want more.