Posts Tagged ‘mystery’

Blog Tour for All This I Will Give to You by Dolores Redondo

September 8, 2018 - 8:00 am No Comments

All This I Will Give to You by Dolores Redondo
Published by AmazonCrossing on 1st September 2018
490 pages

When this book was one of the choices for my Prime First read, I was fascinated by the blurb. Manuel was a famous author. Just finishing another novel when a knock on a door changes his life for ever. Alvaro, the love of his life and husband of 15 years was killed in car accident. But when Manuel goes to Lugo to find out what happens, he finds out that his husband has been keeping a very big secret.
As I started reading this book, I wondered what I would have been like in Manual’s situation and he handled it a lot better than I would have. Manual was a trouble character who has tragedy after tragedy. Being with Alvaro made his life complete, and when he died he puts a wall up to protect his emotions. Meeting up with a retired police officer gets him investigating Alvaro death. The relationship between Manual and Nogueira was unusual but as the story continues they do have friendship. Being with Manual causes Nogueira to look at his own life and the mistakes he has made and slowly with the help of Manual, he comes to terms with his action. The addition of a Lucas, priest and childhood friend of Alvaro makes this unusual investigation team complete. Lucas help chip away Manual’s wall and slowly got Manual to accept just what type of guy Alvaro was.
The story began quite slowly, and whilst there were times when nothing much happened, you were drawn to the picturesque scenes that were unfolding as you read, showing how beautifully written this story was. The scenes at Alvaro family home, enabled you to find out just what a protective nature Alvaro had. Throughout the book Manual had to cope with homophobic family members and you can see Manual’s determination to prove that there was something dark going on in Alvaro’s family and I took an instant dislike to the dowger, Alvaro’s mother, who was a bitter and twisted woman.
This book is a gentle thriller and whilst quite long kept my attention throughout. It took me till 80% of the book before it dawned on me who had been involved in Alvaro’s death. With quite a few red herrings and horrific goings on in the seminary school, this a must read for thriller lover. This is the 1st book I have read by this author and I will look out for more.

 

The Way of All Flesh by Ambrose Parry

August 30, 2018 - 6:53 pm No Comments

The Way of All Flesh by Ambrose Parry

Published by Canongate Books on 30th August 2018

417 pages

Will Raven was going places, apprentice to the renowned Dr Simpson, he was learning midwifery from one of the best. But with a debt hanging over him and a desire to find out who is killing women all over Edinburgh, can Will be the Dr he wants to be.
At the start of this story Will Raven came across as quite pretentious. Quick with his mouth and never far from trouble. He always had something to prove, however as the story progress, you do get to find out more about his former life. By the end of the book he grew on me.
Sarah his partner in crime, was the housemaid of Dr Simpson. Like any maid in the 19th century maids were tended be ignored and women were second best. Throughout this book you could see how ambitious she was and if she was a women today she would of been a doctor, Clever, willing to learn and a very curious mind
I enjoy reading about 19th century and it was a pleasant change for a story to be set in Edinburgh and not London. The book was well researched and it was interesting to learn more about the medical procedures of the time. Whilst child birth was dangerous at that time, reading about it in graphic detail, just made it more real. Whilst this is a thriller it is a bit of a slow burn and it felt more like a backstory, that all changed in the last 25% of the book. As Will and Sarah were getting closer to the murderer it was full on and I was reading it quickly to find out who the murderer was. I enjoy a thriller more if the murderer is not easily guessed and this was one of those books. The ending was not expected and it showed just what type of people Dr Simpson and Will were.
This will be good to read as a series and I for one would love to read more about Will and Sarah.

 

 

 

 

 

The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas

August 2, 2018 - 9:34 pm No Comments

The Psychology of Time Travel by Kate Mascarenhas
Published by Head of Zeus on 9th August 2018
320 pages

What drew me to this book was the unusual story. Margaret, Grace, Estelle and Barbara were pioneers who in 1969 invented time travel. All 4 were as close as sisters until Barbara suffered a psychotic episode live on TV. Shunned by the rest, she lived a quiet life in the countryside. The rest took forward their idea and created the Conclave, an institution who monopolised the time travel industry.
In February 2018, Odette, a young graduate, finds a body, wanting closure, she decided to do her own investigations.
At the start of this book I thought I would get confused with the story as it was changing character and time. However, after the 1st couple of chapters, I soon got into the swing of it. Switching times showed just how planned the story was. Even though it was in different time periods, the story flowed smoothly. Each character was described in detail and unique in their own way. Every characters acted differently in the various timelines and it showed just how much an impact the time travel had on people. As the story progressed, characters like Ruby and Odette developed, and as you followed them on their journeys of discovery, you see them grow into strong confident women. Some of my favourite scenes were when Grace met her younger or older self and threw the paradox theories out the window
The science of time travel did not distract from the story and some of the minute details added to the story. One such touch was when Ruby bought a book about time travellers’ slang which all though something small, helped me understand the story further on. The story covered a whole range of emotions, such as love, death, revenge and you are taken on a roller-coaster of a ride.
This story is beautifully written and it was a refreshing change to read a story which is dominated by women. The mystery element ran throughout and for me I thoroughly enjoyed the explanation on how the murder was done.
This is the 1st book I have read by this author and it will not be the last. I hope there will be more stories of these brave women to come.

The Portrait Lingers like a Whisper by TWM Ashford

June 7, 2018 - 8:59 pm No Comments

The Portrait Lingers like a Whisper by TWM Ashford
Published by White Inc on 5th June 2018
130 pages
Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

I first came across this author when I read his dystopian series Blackwater and loved what I read. So when this book was released I got it straight away.
“Jane” wakes up with no memory, in a strange house and no one to tell her how she got there. Wandering round the house, she meets “Jack” who is in the same predicament. One thing they know they need escape, but with an unnatural darkness surrounding the house and “Jack” not what he seems, Jane knows she is in danger.
Written from Jane’s POV, the story follows Jane as she wanders around the house. There is a sense of desperation as Jane realises that she is in trouble. The pace changes throughout giving the story an intense feel to it. The more she investigates, the more she is confused and whilst she comes across strange experimental drugs none of this helps. The introduction of apparitions makes this feel like a ghost story, but the author had a way of leading you in the wrong direction. The writing style was illustrative and it felt as you were watching Jane as she struggled with her situation. As I was reading this I did not expect the truth about Jane when it was revealed and it was unexpected.
A completely different read from Blackwater and still as good

The Boogeyman’s Intern by Matt Betts

June 1, 2018 - 4:43 am 1 Comment

I have the pleasure to kick off the blog tour for The Boogeyman’s Intern. The Boogeyman’s Intern takes a lighthearted look at things that go bump in the night.

The Boogeyman’s Intern by Matt Betts
Published by Raw Dog Screaming Press 1st June 2018
218 pages
Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

As a child, did you have an imaginary friend. Did the tooth fairy visit you when you lost a tooth. These and other creatures all live together on the Hill, rubbing shoulders with the Gods from the ancient beliefs.
Abe was an imaginary friend, good at his job until he got bored. On his final strike, the committee gave him one more chance, find out who killed one of the elite, the boogeyman Ira. Being the first policeman on the Hill, he puts together a team involving his friend Zane another boogeyman and career counsellor Brady. One big problem, he did not know where to start, so had to rely on his connections in the otherworld.
Living in a land of imaginaries, you come across quite a lot of weird and wonderful characters and it is not often that you read about Norse Gods rubbing shoulders with tooth fairy assistants. Ade was a comical character who relied a lot on his quick comments. Coming across as sarcastic he did rub quite a few people up the wrong way. One of my favourite characters was Brady, who reminded me of one of those aging hippies who would be at camp singing Kumbaya.
I enjoyed how the author brought some of the human world into the Hill, Zane’s obsessiveness over a police badge and Ade would fall back on police TV shows he watched when he was an imaginary friend. What starts out with a mysterious death soon turns into a matter of life and death. The story was a quick read and I really got into it until about 50% as Ade was shown into a cave housing all sorts of strange creatures. This stopped me in my tracks as I could not understand where the story was going but as I kept reading, it became clear the reason for that particular journey. Throughout the story you find out more of Abe former life and his relationship with the human boy Truman. There are some laugh out loud moments thanks to Ade and a unlikely character of a deranged Tooth Fairy, and there were times when you felt sorry for the life Ade had and the troubles he had to overcome. The story reminded me of Monsters Inc. for adults as like the film, the imaginaries relied on children to believe in them
This is the first book I have read by this author and I am interested in to reading more of his work. If you like your fantasy read with a difference than pick up this book.

About the Author
Each night Matt Betts fills a bathtub full of pop culture and then soaks in it, absorbing it through every pore. It’s not pretty. The Ohio native is the author of the speculative poetry collections Underwater Fistfight and See No Evil, Say No Evil, as well as the novels Odd Men Out and Indelible Ink. He lives in Columbus with his wife and their two boys.
Raw Dog Screaming Press’ Science Fiction/ Adventure Imprint, Dog Star Books, Thrives
In 2013 RDSP celebrated its 10th year in publishing by launching a Science Fiction imprint, Dog Star Books, to much fanfare. The initial releases have received lots of critical praise. Dog Star Books brings readers’ favorite sub-genres of Science Fiction Adventure under the imprint’s unifying brand. Explosive covers by artist Bradley Sharp invoke the ideas of new pulp, strange worlds, and futures that never were or will be. Dog Star is the destination where meta meets pop, where intellect is fun, and where imagination pulses in all its sensual glory.