Posts Tagged ‘Folklore’

The Girl in the Fort by Tracy Fahey

November 19, 2018 - 10:47 pm No Comments

The Girl in the Fort by Tracy Fahey
Published by Fox Spirit Books on 26th October 2017
230 pages

Vivian was a city girl born and bred in Dublin, she acted older than her age. When her dad had to go to America, he left her with her maternal grandparents. Not knowing anything about them and being stuck in the country with nothing to do, she hated everything about it. However, when she began to learn about the folklore and found the fort, her time there became more interesting.
Vivian was like a lot of young girls, living in a city there was always something to do. Staying in the country she had a lot of adjusting to do.
Set in the 80s I enjoyed reminiscing whilst I read this story, especially getting Smash Hits every week and using the family phone to make a call and not to chat for ages.
As the author is an expert in folklore, I knew that I would be transported into a magical read and I was not disappointed. A coming of age story, you follow Vivian as she makes new friends and starts to believe in magic. When there was trouble she showed a certain level of maturity which you would not expect in such a young girl. Scattered throughout the story was old folklore tales told by her Grandma, and I enjoyed reading her stories as it linked the past to Vivian’s present. This was an easy read as it was so beautifully written, the descriptive writing enabled you to imagine that you had found the fort and was exploring the countryside. As I was reading this I did wonder whether the author delved into her childhood for her ideas as I imagined her listening to tales told by her grandma.
This is a perfect book for any age and a book that you get so involved in that you can read it in one sitting. I am looking forward to reading more from this author and I hope that she brings out more novels.

The Story Keeper by Anna Mazzola

July 25, 2018 - 10:02 pm No Comments

The Story Keeper by Anna Mazzola
Published by Tinder Press on 26th July 2018
352 pages

In 19th century Great Britain folklore was popular especially with the working class. Everyone would gather together to listen and swap stories. Each part of the country had variant stories and the task of collecting such stories were down to a small select few called folklorist.
Audrey Hart grew up listening to these stories. Unhappy with her life in London, she jumped at the chance to go to the Isle of Skye and help collect the traditional stories. As Audrey starts to collect the stories, she hears about the missing girls and when one turns up dead, she wants to find out whether it is the faerie folk or a resident of the Isle.
Lately I have read quite a few historical fiction, one thing they all had in common was the thriller element and this one was no different. However the addition of the folklore made the story more fascinating. Audrey was not your typical woman of that time, single, headstrong and ambitious. Travelling by herself to the Isle of Skye was brave.
Reading this story you can see that it was well researched not just the historical element but the folklore as well. The descriptive style of the author’s writers made the scenes come alive and it felt that you were there watching the mist roll in, whilst the mystery unfolded. The story never seemed to slow down as there was always something going on, whether it was Audrey walking around the countryside collecting stories, or her trying to fight for the girls. Whilst I had an inkling of the culprit, the reasoning surprised me. Whether you are a lover of historical fiction or are fascinated with folklore you will be in for a magical read.

The Haunter of the Moor: An Irish Ghost Story by Jeffrey Kosh

June 19, 2017 - 9:14 pm No Comments

The Haunter of the Moor: An Irish Ghost Story by Jeffrey Kosh

Published by Optimus Maximus Publishing on 13th February 2016

212 pages

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

Patrick Conroy was studying to be a doctor, wanting to go back to his ancestral roots, he goes to university in Dublin. Like the majority of students; he partied hard with very little studying. As his finals got closer he began to panic so decided to find a remote village so he could concentrate on his studies. Settling up on Ballymore, Patrick stays at Talbot house a manor steeped in dark history.

Patrick as a medical student did not believe in the supernatural, and whilst he listened to Siobhan and Maggie, I think at the start he was humouring them. The deeper he investigated the mystery, the more confused he got, he did not know who to trust even though his heart wanted to believe Maggie. Always the true gent, there was a funny moment when he ran outside and forgot to put his trousers on, all because of the barking dogs.

Reading this book, you can tell that it is well researched, whether it is the flowing language or the Irish history and folklore. Written from Patrick’s POV, helps make this story more intense as you feel that you are observing Patrick doubt his own sanity. Patrick’s journal was used to help explain the supernatural element, given it the feel that he did not believe what he was writing and also showed how folklore is twisted to suit the teller. Just as I thought it was ending in on a cliff-hanger, in stepped Father Wales a very staunch catholic priest, reading Patrick’s story from the priest’s POV helped explain more of the folklore and just how much trouble Patrick was in.

A creepy story with a traditional gothic feel to it.