Posts Tagged ‘Fairy Tales’

The Enchanted Kingdoms: Haunting Fairytales Book 1 by RL Weeks

January 18, 2017 - 10:50 pm No Comments

The Enchanted Kingdoms: Haunting Fairytales Book 1 by RL Weeks

Published 26th July 2016

Pages 299

Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

What would happen if Bella met Snow White and Ariel, this is one answer you will not find watching any Disney film.

There are a few main characters in this book. Edward an egotistical prince, who does not care who he hurts to get what he wants. Stilts a magician who is a bit of a conman. Bella a feisty lone parent of James who is not afraid of adventure.  Snow a young princess who lost her mom at an early age and was brought up by her Granddad, Ariel is a mermaid who didn’t fit in with her family and just wanted to be human and like all fairy tales there is a wicked witch called Lori.

The majority of books using a fairy tale theme usually concentrate on one story but this book was different, using sections from 11 fairy tales, the author creates an original story. Whilst reading this book I could not get over how easy it was for some of the characters to double cross each other to get what they wanted. Edward and Stilt were fine candidates for this, in fact, the amount of double crossing they did, I was surprised that they remembered who they owed favours to and why they remained friends. My favourite character was Snow as we all know her as the sweet and innocent princess that loved her housework, but in this story, she was a strong young teenager who wanted revenge on the person who murdered her mother. She even had her 7 dwarves, but they were not the dwarves that we know and love. Although Lori was the wicked witch, I could understand why she became that person, and as the saying goes, hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.

A well written story, full of action that will renew your interest in fairy tales. Book 2 is already out so the adventure can continue

Along Came a Wolf

January 6, 2016 - 1:03 pm No Comments

The Yellow Hoods #1 (Steampunk meets Fairytales)
Author: Adam Dreece
Release date: 24th April 2014
Publisher: ADZO publishing inc.
Page count: 221 pp

Meet Tee, Elly and Richy, best friends and members of the Yellow Hoods. The name comes from the yellow cloaks they wear that hide a few surprises. Thanks to Tee’s grandad Nikolas, a famous eccentric inventor, the three have fun trying out his inventions including spark sticks, sail carts and an amazing treehouse. Nikolas reminds me of Caracticus Potts from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.
Enter the baddie LeLoup (French for wolf) who is tasked to steal the steam engine plans from Nikolas. Although at the start you don’t realise this as he gets held up by three brothers Squeals, Bore and Bakon the Cochon brothers (French for pig) you think that the three brothers are the bad ones. Tee steps in and rescues LeLoup from their clutches. He quickly forgets this whilst he tries and completes the mission.
Throughout this book you really feel the love that Tee has for her family and friends and the love they felt for her.
Whilst reading it, I found myself guessing the fairy tales and with the splash of Steampunk kept it interesting. This book is written for young and old alike and the fun titled chapters helps keep you amused. The book kept my interest from start to finish and although not a long book, it was jam packed with action and fun.
WARNING. You may find yourself laughing out loud as there are some funny lines. One instant was when Bakon, and Eg the Captain’s daughter started dating.
A good start to the series, now I just have to buy part 2, see what happens now the Hound is after the Yellow Hoods

Joanne Harris Fairy Tales

October 14, 2015 - 12:51 pm No Comments

Gollancz has acquired world rights to publish a collection of dark, captivating fairy tales from Whitbread-shortlisted author, Joanne Harris. The multi-million-copy bestselling writer habitually delights her 25, 000 followers on Twitter with serialised short stories shared with the hashtag #storytime. Honeycomb is the first beautifully illustrated volume of Joanne Harris’s captivating and brilliantly imaginative #storytime tales.

Joanne Harris writes: “I started writing my #storytime tales four years ago, live on Twitter, as an exercise in different storytelling narratives. Since then, some of them have become songs, a stage show – even a couple of mini-operas – and now I’m delighted to be able to collaborate with Charles Vess – an artist I’ve admired for years – to make them into a book; an illustrated collection of new fairy stories with a dark, traditional feel – for people of all ages.”

Joanne Harris’s first adult epic fantasy novel The Gospel of Loki was published by Gollancz in February 2014. It was exceptionally well received and sold over 25,000 copies. The bestselling author of fifteen novels has already published two successful collections of short fiction, Jigs and Reels and A Cat, A Hat And A Piece Of String, and is a great advocate for the power of the short story.

Honeycomb will be beautifully illustrated throughout, with line drawings and full-colour plate sections by Charles Vess, the award-winning artist who illustrated Stardust by Neil Gaiman and The Ladies of Grace Adieu by Suzanne Clarke.

Charles Vess adds: “I’ve been reading Joanne’s work since the publication of Chocolat and Blackberry Wine. I’m more than excited by the opportunity this project gives me to transform her words into pen and ink marks and washes of colour onto the printed page.”

The novel will be published in hardback and e-book on the 21st September 2017.

Praise for The Gospel of Loki

“lively and fun” The Sunday Times

“retells the sagas …in all their wintry, saucy, grandiose, melancholy glory” The Financial Times

“Wickedly imaginative” Glamour

“hilarious” Good Housekeeping

“Witty and magical” Vogue

Sophie Calder
Publicity Manager
Gollancz
The Orion Publishing Group

Fearie Tales: Stories of the Grimm

August 19, 2015 - 4:43 am No Comments

Edited by Stephen Jones
Illustrated by Alan Lee
Jo Fletcher Books
Page size: 409pp
Release Date: Summer 2014

With the inception of TV series Grimm, and the fascination with all things Grimm or Fairy Tale, it’s no surprise that there have been a plethora of fairy tales retold hitting the literary market. However, it takes a lot to stand out from the crowd, and this visually stunning hardback, which is surely intended to be a collector’s piece, manages just that.
Edited by genre stalwart Stephen Jones, featuring art work (each story/fairy tale is illustrated) by Alan Lee, this is a beautiful work of art. And to top it off, the writers list is simply a prize for any editor, and lover of dark fiction.
The tome starts with an introduction by Jones, which discusses the Grimm brothers, the oral tradition of folk tales and the dark nature of these stories, some of which are included in this horror anthology.
The book starts with ‘The Wilful Child’ which leads neatly into ‘Find My Name’ by Ramsey Campbell, an alternative Rumplestiltskin in which granny Doreen looks after young Benjamin, who talks about the dark man who visits him at night. The man who speaks to her through the baby monitor, demanding what he wants her to give him. Surreal and dark, this tale really is a twisted story, and the Rumplestiltskin of the story is thoroughly evil. When you read a Ramsey Campbell you know it deep within your bones; like a Barker, a King or a Jackson, there is a distinctive inimitable style to his work that leaves you uncomfortable yet strangely fulfilled. This is the stand out story of the anthology, along with ‘By the Weeping Gate’ by Angela Slatter.
Next up though in the running order worth mentioning is ‘Down to a Sunless Sea’ by Neil Gaiman of Neverwhere fame. Less than a few pages long, this simple, lyrical tale is fascinating and strangely compelling. I’ve obviously heard of Gaiman, as have many within the genre, and on this tale alone, his talent is obvious.
If time were on my side I could relate every story, spoil the plots for the reader and write the longest review in history. Not really a good idea, so this is just a taster.
Suffice to say, with the stunning illustrations, the original fairy tales and new versions of each by a brilliant selection of authors, this is one absolutely beautiful collection. A must have for any horror fan. This is Grim/m with a Capital G