Posts Tagged ‘dystopian’

Lost Objects by Marian Womack

September 18, 2018 - 9:47 pm No Comments

Lost Objects by Marian Womack
Published by Luna Press Publishing on 3rd July 2018
119 pages

A day does not go by when the news does not feature global warming or a certain animal on the endangered list. This book contains 10 short stories exploring the impact of extinct creatures, a lack of food and changing climates,
Regardless which story your read, you soon come to realise that every story is beautifully written. The descriptive style of this author made me feel that I was going on a discovery and as I followed each character I was instantly submerge in their story.
Some of the stories that stood out for me were Black Isle: Based in Scotland, Dr Andrew Hay and his colleagues were scientist trying to restore nature. As I read this story I got the sense that there was something destructive was going to happen. The sense of foreboding especially when there was no bird song, had me wondering how far scientist were going to create their ideal world and one of the strangest things was the climate in Scotland. Constant sunshine and no rain.
Love (Ghost) Story. The MC had a ghost that appeared every evening. Throughout this story I found myself asking myself questions. How did he die? Did she kill him? Was she a victim of domestic violence? Because of all these questions, I felt real sympathy for the MC, and I felt a sense of loss for her as I felt that even in death, the ghost caused her to stop living.
The Ravisher, The Thief: Taking you to a mystical land, following Paloma who lived in a land were birds were heralded as gods. As to do some translating she learns a secret that has a big impact on the land. This story had a magical feel to it and I enjoyed reading about how the birds were trained and cared for. The story built up to an unexpected and tragic ending.
As a new author to me this book was a great introduction to her work. Being short stories of various length, it was perfect if you wanted a quick read as you could read a story in less than 1 hour.
Another great find from Luna Press Publishing

The Survival Game by Nicky Singer

July 27, 2018 - 9:38 pm No Comments

The Survival Game by Nicky Singer
Published by Hodder Children’s Books on 26th July 2018
384 pages

Global warming is affecting the world and Mhairi Anne Bain is with her parents in Sudan. But when they get asked to leave the country, Mhairi ends up on a journey that puts her life in danger.
The majority of the story follows Mhairi as she is tries to get to her Grandma’s house in the Isle of Arran in Scotland. However, throughout the book more of Mhairi’s perilous journey from the Sudan is revealed. Whilst I was reading this story I kept forgetting that she was only 14 as the things she had done made her seem so much older. To stop her getting further hurt, she had put up a wall, but once she found the young orphan boy she began to soften and even though it was only slight she did begin to care. The relationship between Mhairi and Mo was perfect and was just like being brother and sister.
Not only did Mhairi had to worry about getting home, the political problems was also a concern and the author added an interesting concept for culling the population. People could only live till 74, you could give away years to someone you love or get them taken off you if you do wrong. All this was recorded in your papers, which were more valuable than gold. If you lost your papers you were more likely end up in a detention centre.
The story is evenly paced. The tension is built up near the end as more is known about Mhairi’s past and as I was reading this I wanted to shout that she was a child and that she should be treated as a child. I am not going to say much about the end but I am still thinking about it know whilst I am writing this review. The story was beautifully written and I am going to recommend this to all my friends who like a dystopian read.
This story will make you think about the what ifs especially as here in the UK were are getting a very unnatural heatwave and global warming is mentioned more on the news. A good dystopian read, which even though it is tagged for children, is a good read for teenagers or adults alike.

Serenity Falling by GL Cromarty

July 10, 2018 - 7:22 pm No Comments

Serenity Falling by GL Cromarty

Published by Creative Texts Publisher LLC on 21st August 2017
305 pages
Reviewed by Yvonne Davies


The wall has been repaired but Hannah and her fellow Aterrans are still not safe. The powers at be in Aterra, still think they are in danger from the Shadowlands especially John Tanis.
Each chapter alternates between the Aterrans and Shadowlands, this enables the story to flow and showed just how much danger Hannah and co were in. Coming to the forefront was Theo and Nate, whilst genetically modified they had a childlike quality to them and always wanted to do the right thing. As their skills became known, they became an integral part to the cause. In book 1 Bill’s character was already not liked and just when you think he cannot get any worse, he shocks you just showing what a narcissist he was. Whilst Tanis gets a conscious and a slightly softer side peaks through. The banter and bickering between Tanis and Garren continues showing a sense of respect they have for each other.
Whilst the Janu do not play a big part in this story, there is more than enough bloodshed to satisfy the action fans. With the addition of technology gives the story a more apprehensive feel to it and you will find yourself wanting to keep reading to find out what happens. There are scenes that you will not see coming and at times I just sat there in shock.
This story had a different feel compared to book 1 and I could appreciate how much hard work the author put into this story. There was a lot going on, but the pace and well thought plot made it a good addition to the series. Finishing on an unexpected cliffhanger, with the addition of new characters I’m off to read the final book in the series

Out with a Whimper by Michael Noe

June 17, 2018 - 3:17 pm No Comments

Out with a Whimper by Michael Noe
Published by J Ellington Ashton Press on 23rd March 2017
133 pages
Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

In all zombie reads or films, you always have that one person, a hero ready to fight or die, save as many people as they can and have a warm beer in the evening. But what about the people who just want to keep their heads down and survive. Matt Chapman is one of those people. Written as a journal from his POV, you follow Matt as he comes to terms with the decisions he made.
Matt had no family and it was easy for him to hole up and wait it out. The thing is he was not ashamed of it. Whilst he was used to his own company, it was not long until he missed the simple things in life and slowly you watch him start to crumble. Staying under the radar whilst he went out pillaging he soon realised that drink and drugs helped his moods. Stuck in a rut, he is just surviving, but a meeting with a feisty woman soon helps him live again.
This book showcases the author’s skills, with the majority of the story just about Matt, we watch as the character develops as he journeys out of his home. The story is descriptive, the sights and smells that Matt encounters makes you feel that you are following him on his journey. With the addition of the other characters show just how much Matt had developed as a person, although at times his hard nosed sarcastic self does still make an appearance.
You can feel the tension when Matt went out and even though you knew he was alone, you still expected something to jump out at him. There were times that I had a giggle, one scene was when a drunk was singing down the road swinging on the lamp posts, with not a care in the world. As it is a zombie story expect some violence, and some of it comes from an unlikely source.
If you want a zombie story with a differences then pick up this book, and because you will be drawn into Matt’s story you will find it a quick read.

Eve of Man by Tom Fletcher and Giovanna Fletcher

May 30, 2018 - 9:44 pm No Comments

Eve of Man by Tom Fletcher and Giovanna Fletcher
Published by Penguin on 31st May 2018
408 pages
Reviewed by Yvonne Davies

50 years where only boys were born. The earth is in trouble, then an unlikely couple have a miracle. Eve the first girl born. Living in a dome to protect her, is she the answer to save the world.
Bram, pilot and son of one of the powerful men in the EPO. He has know Eve for a long time thanks to high tech technology.
But what if they both want something different?
Eve lived a lonely life, whilst she lived in beautiful surrounds and had the “Mothers” with her throughout her growing up, she had no one of her own age. What she learned was from archives and watched 24/7. Her only companion was Holly an AI. Even though she had a sheltered life, she was wise to the EPO tricks. As she grew up she started to question her existents and the reason behind her imprisonment.
Bram was one of the pilots of Holly. Being the son of one of the big bosses, did not go down well with some of his team. But he was good at what he did. However when he began to get to close to Eve and question authority, he had to make a stand.
With an unique storyline, this story captured my attention from page 1. As the story progresses you find out the character’s history and even though Eve and Bram had not officially met, they had a similar background. Bram was a strong character and this was probably due to his abusive father. His true leaderships skills comes to force further in the book. The relationship between Eve and Bram was innocent and sweet and you want to carry on reading to see how their friendship developed. Whilst some of the mothers’ history was revealed in the story, I would like to know about the them as they remind me of a group of nuns.
Like any dystopian story, you have the downtrodden and this book is no different. The Freevers are a group of people that are not happy with the situation with the EPO. Wanting to free Eve, they work in the shadows for their cause. Whilst technology plays a big part in the story, the authors managed to blend some lower tech into the mix, so look out for a Rubiks cube the bane of many 80s child’s life. The book has a steady flow to it, and the action builds up to a dramatic climax which leaves you wanting more.
Although this book is written by two authors the style of the writing makes it impossible to tell who had written what. This book is ideal for young and old alike and if you are looking for your first dystopian novel this will be a perfect read. Be warned this does finish on a cliff hanger and I hope that I do not have to wait to long for book 2. A great start to this series.